AIP Coffee – Review of Roasted Chicory Root Coffee

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One of the questions I get asked the most about the autoimmune Paleo protocol (AIP) is what can I drink if I can’t have coffee?

Coffee has become so entrenched in our habits that we’ve become addicted not only to the daily dose of caffeine it offers us but also to that aromatic smell that wakes our senses every morning. So, what do you do if you’re starting AIP and have to forgo coffee for 30-60 days if not longer?

A reader emailed me about chicory root coffee a while back, but I didn’t see it for sale until a few weeks ago. So, I decided to give this naturally non-caffeinated AIP-compliant “coffee” substitute a try.

AIP Coffee Substitutes

If tea isn’t a good AIP coffee substitute for you, then definitely give roasted chicory root “coffee” a try. However, if you’re a coffee snob, then please don’t get your hopes up that this is going to replace your high-end espresso or drip brew coffee.

What is Roasted Chicory Root

Roasted chicory root is literally the roasted roots of the chicory plant, and they’re pretty popular in Europe as a coffee-substitute (although it’s growing in popularity in the US now). Below is a photo of the chicory flower.

chicory flower

Many people like to add roasted chicory root to regular coffee to enhance the coffee flavor and color (e.g., a typical recipe uses 2/3 regular coffee and 1/3 roasted chicory root), and in desperate war times, chicory root has also been used as a cheap alternative to regular coffee.

coffee

Because roasted chicory roots “coffee” isn’t made from a bean (like regular coffee), it is AIP-friendly.

Granules or Roots?

You can generally buy 100% chicory root in 2 forms:

First, you can buy it as the roasted roots of the plant, in which case you put it into into a tea strainer and brew it in hot water for 7-10 minutes or you can make it in a French press. If you want to buy the pure roasted chicory roots, then you can buy them on Amazon here.

Alternatively, you can buy Instant Chicory Coffee, which is the type I found at the store. Basically, they brew the chicory coffee for you, then dry it to get the dried flavor granules. So, for instant chicory coffee, all you have to do is add hot water to those dried granules.

aip coffee substitute chicory root

What does Roasted Chicory Root Taste Like?

While I like roasted chicory root as a drink and it does share some similar tastes to coffee, it’s not really the same as coffee. It just doesn’t have that amazing aroma that coffee has.

It looks like coffee and it has a slightly bitter earthy flavor similar to coffee, but that’s really where the similarities end. Having said that, if you typically enjoy your coffee with coconut milk or almond milk, then you might find roasted chicory root to be a decent replacement. Also, if you’re desperate for a cup of coffee when you’re on AIP, then definitely give this a try. Just bear in mind that it’s not the same!

Health Benefits of Roasted Chicory Root “AIP Coffee”

  1. May Help with Digestion
    Chicory root contains inulin, which is a prebiotic (i.e., the fiber that probiotics feed on in your gut). So, it can promote healthy gut bacteria growth. However, it could cause some digestive issues like gas and bloating if you take in too much inulin or if you have preexisting issues like IBS.
  2. Low in Sugar
    Chicory root has hardly any sugar, which makes it a good option if you have blood sugar issues. Most of the carbohydrates in chicory root is inulin, which isn’t digestible.
  3. Antibacterial and Antifungal Properties
    Some studies have suggested that chicory root may have antibacterial and antifungal properties, but more research needs to be done to show anything definitive.
  4. High in Antioxidants
    A few studies have also looked into the benefits of chicory roots due to their antioxidant content.

Have you tried roasted chicory root coffee? What did you think?

Let me know in the comments below whether you liked roasted chicory root coffee.

Images: Copyright (c) F. D. Richards cc and Internet Archive Book Images

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Comments

  1. says

    I’ve been brewing and drinking coffee like beverages from roasted chicory and dandelion roots for more than 25 years. I have recipes in both of my current cookbooks, The Garden of Eating & The Ice Dream Cookbook. If you brew them correctly (don’t use a drip coffee maker) they can taste robust, hearty, and a lot like coffee. My dinner guests, cooking students and friends have been so amazed at the flavor for decades!

    There are many health benefits to be had when you combine both of these roots, as herbalists have for centuries. You can buy and brew Teeccino or by instant Dandy Blend (online). Although both contain barley, they have been Eliza tested and found to be free of gluten because of how they are made. The barley does not extract into the water when brewed or when brewed and freeze dried. Even celiacs have used the products without problems.

    Great stuff when made really dark!

    • Anna says

      That’s really interesting information that “barley does not extract into the water when brewed” because I recently bought Yogi Tea Choco Aztec Spice and there is barley malt in the ingredient list. I asked in two different sources (Yogi Tea Contact) whether this tea is gluten free and one said yes and the other said no. So is it really like that when I brew tea it no longer contains gluten from the barley malt…?

  2. Gina says

    I bought some chicory root last week, and have really enjoyed the flavor since being coffee free for 60-plus days now. Unfortunately it did cause me some digestive issues so I’ve had to cut way back on my use of it. (I was drinking about 3 cups a day for the first week.) It is something I will consume once in a while though when I want that coffee kind of feeling. :) I’ve been doing strict AIP for 7 weeks now, and I am seeing MAJOR improvement

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